Go Compose! 2017

Go Compose! is a 3-day composition course for young composers and creative musicians aged 14-19 and in full time education. It’s a unique opportunity to work with professional composers and musicians.

Go Compose 2016 took place 15th-17th October at Woodend Barn, Banchory. With the help from professional composers John De Simone (sound's composer in residence) and Eleanor Alberga and musicians from Red Note Ensemble, young composers created their own, original piece of music. The course finishes finished with a fantastic performance from the players of Red Note, with 11 new pieces being aired for the first time. Each of the composers introduced their own works, as well as producing a short programme note about the pieces, explaining how they had got to the point of completion over the last few days.

Go Compose! is a collaboration between sound, Red Note Ensemble and Sound and Music with support from D’Oyly Carte Charitable Trust, David and June Gordon Memorial Trust, The Hugh Fraser Foundation, Aberdeen Endowments Trust, Woodend Barn and soundbytes investors Margaret Carlaw and Derek Ogston.


David and Goliath - Amy Stewart

This piece is inspired by the tale of David and Goliath. The flute and cello, respecti­vely characterise the weak warrior with a strong heart, and the fierce giant who expects to win the battle. The climax oc­curs echoing heavy footsteps of marching troops, as David and Goliath co­nstantly lash out at one another. In the end there always a victor. Who has the last word?

Splash - David Bruce

This is an abstract texture piece, based loosely on the 20th century compositional technique of serialism, using all 12 musical notes in a set order to form interesting harmonies and colours. This results in a largely atonal piece of music, which utilises uncommon elements to make an impact.

Selgae - Gareth Flett

I took inspiration to write this piece of music, Selgae, from the Stone Age Tomb of the Eagles – a Neolithic site where eagle skulls were buried. This made me create a fantasy story of a community, who are slowly driven crazy by a pack of eagles. The music tries to create the feeling of the eagles hunting and gradually becomes fuzzy, until the sad ending which reflects the hurt feeling of people in the area.

The Overlord - Calum Whyte Wilken

The piece is in 4/4 time, has wild dynamic changes and sounds pretty wicked, better bring ear plugs! 

Excursion - Oisin Lyons

The theme of my piece is journeying, as the name suggests. You will hear what starts as a simple, light-hearted theme being varied in loosely defined ‘episodes’, which I hope conveys all the experiences you can have on a journey, whatever it may be, and how your perception of something you thought you knew inside out can be changed in so many ways.

Humoresque - Morgan Brougham

"Classical music isn't fun"

"Classical music is niche"

"Classical music is what you make of it!"

A3 Conqueror Paper - Leo Thomson

I set out to write a nice, calm, relaxed piece of music. I don’t know what happened.

Distant Valleys - Megan McNicoll

This piece of music is about a subject which is very close to my heart. Distant Valleys describes the simple beauty which is found within the Scottish Highlands and the powerful emotions that you can feel when surrounded by such a serene and picturesque landscape.

The Course of War - Ruaraidh Williams

This piece depicts the course of WW1 and post war. The piece has 4 main sections; the first illustrating the joy and patriotic country going into the war. The second reveals the harsh reality of war in eerie no-mans land and the dropping of shells and gunfire. The third section gives a sense of mourning of the post-war survivors. And the fourth final section, peace is restored, or is it?

Lucius - Caitlin B. Whyte Wilken

A piece inspired by a preconceived original character, the music is meant to capture the dark, gothic nature of vampires. The piece has four distinct sections, each one representing both a facet in the character's personality, as well as the stages in a vampire's hunt.

Ambiguous Decertification - Andrew Kelsey

Named after two random words from The Economist.

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